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A Dead Certainty

A
Dead
Certainty
is an acrostic for adc.

Film

"A Dead Certainty" is a 1920 British silent sports drama film directed by George Dewhurst and starring Gregory Scott, Poppy Wyndham and Cameron Carr. It was based on a novel by Nathaniel Gould. A jockey comes under pressure from his girlfriend's relations to fix a horse race.

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for A Dead Certainty

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Google previewBloomsbury Dictionary of Idioms (2009)

by Gordon Jarvie

It later came to mean a firm grip, and then 'a dead certainty'. CIRCUMFERENTIALLY. circumferentially challenged fat. It's a special shop for the circumferentially challenged. A humorous euphemism, but see also challenged. Also 'horizontally ...

Google previewThe Anglo-American Encyclopedia and Dictionary: Dictionary department (A-Z) (1904)

Certain or unerring as death; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. {Colloquial.) (18) No longer in use, unspoken, disused; as, A dead language. II. Technically: 1. Mech., Building, dbc.

Google previewA Supplement to the Imperial Dictionary, English, Technological, and Scientific (1855)

An Extensive Collection of Words, Terms, and Phrases ... Together with Numerous Obsolete, Obsolescent, and Scottish Words ... Not Included in Previous English Dictionaries by John Ogilvie

Perfect or complete ; as, a dead level ; a dead certainty ; so, also, a dead shot, that is, a perfect or unerring marksman. — Dead letter, a letter remaining in the post-office uncalled for. — Dead-alive, or dead and alii:e, dull; inactive; moping.

Google previewThe imperial dictionary, English, technological, and scientific (1856)

adapted to the present state of literature, science, and art, on the basis of Webster's dictionary, with the addition of many thousand words and phrases from the other standard dictionaries and encyclopedias, and from numerous other sources ... by Noah Webster

Perfect or complete; as, a dead level ; a dead certainty ; so, also, a dead shot, that is, a perfect or unerring marksman. — Dead letter, a letter remaining in the post- office uncalled for. — Dead-alive, or dead and alive, dull; inactive; moping.

Google previewThe International Encyclopaedic Dictionary ... (1901)

Certain or unerring as death; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. ( Colloquial.) - (18). No longer in use, unspoken, disused; as, A dead language. II.

Google previewA New English-Hindustani Dictionary (1883)

With Illustrations from English Literature and Colloquial English, Tr. Into Hindustani by S. W. Fallon

A dead certainty. Be-chuk nithehai. [nithanah ...

Google previewThe American Encyclopædic Dictionary (1897)

by S. J. Herrtage, John A. Williams, Robert Hunter

Certain or unerring as death ; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. (Colloquial.) (18) No longer in use, unspoken, disused; as, A dead language. II. Technically : 1. Mech., Building, etc.

Google previewThe Imperial Encyclopaedic Dictionary (1901)

A New and Exhaustive Work of Reference to the English Language, Defining Over 250,000 Words, with a Full Account of Their Origin, Pronunciation and Use. Comprising a General Encyclopaedia of Art, Science, Invention and Discovery; a Gazetteer and Atlas of the World; a Compendious Dictionary of Universal Biography, Etc by Robert Hunter

Certain or unerring as death; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. (Colloquial.) < \>) No longer in use, unspoken, disusod; as, A dead language. II. Technically: 1.

Google previewAn American Dictionary of the English Language (1848)

Exhibiting the Origin, Orthography, Pronunciation, and Definitions of Words by Noah Webster

Perfect or complete; as, a dead level, a dead certainty; so, also, a dead shot, that is, a perfect or uner ring marksman-24. In law, cut off from the rights of a citizen; ...

Google previewLloyd's Encyclopædic dictionary (1895)

by Robert Hunter

Certain or unerring as death; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. (Colloquial.) (18) No longer in use, unspoken, disused; as, A dead language. IL. Technically: 1. Mech., Building, die.: 1) Lustreless ...

Google previewLloyd's Encyclopaedic Dictionary (1896)

A New and Original Work of Reference to the Words in the English Language

as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. (CoUoquiaL) (18) No longer in use, unspoken, disused; as, A dead language. II, Technically: 1. Mech., Building, etc ; ( l ) Lustreless (as of some kinds of тя> polished or unburnished metallic surface*). Also of ...

Google previewThe Modern World Dictionary of the English Language ... (1906)

To which is Added a Compendium of Historical, Biographical, Geographical, Scientific, Religious, and Sociological Names, and a Complete Summary of Human Achievement in the Nineteenth & Twentieth Centuries ...

Certain or unerring as death; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty. (Colloquial.) ...

Google previewThe Encyclopaedic Dictionary (1883)

A New & Original Work of Reference to All the Words in the English Language, with a Full Account of Their Origin, Meaning, Pronunciation, & Use

Certain or unerring as death ; as, A dead shot, a dead certainty.

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