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Absolute idealism

Explanation

Absolute idealism is an ontologically monistic philosophy attributed to G. W. F. Hegel. It is Hegel's account of how being is ultimately comprehensible as an all-inclusive whole. Hegel asserted that in order for the thinking subject to be able to know its object at all, there must be in some sense an identity of thought and being. Otherwise, the subject would never have access to the object and we would have no certainty about any of our knowledge of the world. To account for the differences between thought and being, however, as well as the richness and diversity of each, the unity of thought and being cannot be expressed as the abstract identity "A=A". Absolute idealism is the attempt to demonstrate this unity using a new "speculative" philosophical method, which requires new concepts and rules of logic. According to Hegel, the absolute ground of being is essentially a dynamic, historical process of necessity that unfolds by itself in the form of increasingly complex forms of being and of consciousness, ultimately giving rise to all the diversity in the world and in the concepts with which we think and make sense of the world.

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for Absolute idealism

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Google previewThe Blackwell Dictionary of Western Philosophy (2008)

by Nicholas Bunnin, Jiyuan Yu

Hegel's absolute idealism is an attempt to describe systematically both nature and human social existence. It does not deny the existence of an external and objective world, but explains the world by assuming that there is a purposive ...

Google previewIdealist Political Philosophy (2008)

Pluralism and Conflict in the Absolute Idealist Tradition by Colin Tyler

Absolute idealism is a philosophical and political doctrine whose errors and sins seem legion. Absolute idealists have been accused of neglecting or denigrating empirical experience and knowledge in favour of the demands of a grossly ...

Google previewThe Cambridge Companion to Hegel (1993)

by Frederick C. Beiser

Absolute idealism means that nothing exists which is not a manifestation of the Idea, that is, of rational necessity. Everything exists for a purpose, that of the coming to be of rational self-consciousness, and this requires that all that exists be the ...

Google previewUnderstanding Society, A Survey of Modern Social Theory (2016)

Sociology, Sociology by CTI Reviews

Absolute idealism: Absolute idealism is an ontologically monistic philosophy attributed.

Google previewTHE MASTERY OF BEING - A Study of the Ultimate Principle of Reality & The Practical Application Thereof (2016)

Begin Your Quest for Truth, Uncover the Secrets of the Spirit in You - the Energy, Life and Law of the Spirit by William Walker Atkinson

Absolute Idealism is the highest form of philosophical teaching. It holds that ...

Google previewArchetypes of Wisdom, An Introduction to Philosophy (2016)

Philosophy, Philosophy by CTI Reviews

Absolute idealism: Absolute idealism is an ontologically monistic philosophy attributed to G. W. F. Hegel.

Google previewThe Complete Works of William Walker Atkinson (Unabridged) (2016)

The Key To Mental Power Development & Efficiency, The Power of Concentration, Thought-Force in Business and Everyday Life, The Secret of Success, Mind Power, Raja Yoga, Self-Healing by Thought Force… by William Walker Atkinson

Absolute Idealism is the highest form of philosophical teaching. It holds that ...

Google previewOn Aesthetics (2016)

Philosophy, Philosophy by CTI Reviews

Absolute idealism: Absolute idealism is an ontologically monistic philosophy attributed to G. W. F. Hegel. It is Hegel's accountofhow beingisultimately comprehensible asan allinclusive whole. Hegel assertedthat in order forthethinking subject ...

Google previewPhilosophical Conversations (2016)

by CTI Reviews

Absolute idealism is an ontologically monistic philosophy attributed to G. W. F. Hegel. It is Hegel's account of how being is ultimately comprehensible as an all- inclusive whole. Hegel asserted that in order for the thinking subject (human reason ...

Google previewBiographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers (2012)

by Stuart Brown, Diane Collinson, Robert Wilkinson, Wellcome Advanced Fellow in Clinical Science Imperial College London Member Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine Robert Wilkinson

Absolute Idealism A form of idealism that stems from Schelling and Hegel and which includes Hegelianism, though it was developed outside Germany as much with reference to native philosophical controversy as to Hegel. Forms of absolute ...

Google previewThe Routledge Dictionary of Philosophy (2009)

by Michael Proudfoot, A.R. Lacey

Absolute idealism developed after Kant, notably with Hegel, and was popular in Britain from about 1865 to 1925. It takes many forms, but its central point is that there is only one ultimately real thing, the Absolute, which is spiritual in nature.

Google previewDictionary of Philosophy (2002)

by Alan Lacey

Absolute idealism developed after Kant, notably with Hegel, and was popular in Britain from about 1865 to 1925. It takes many forms, but its central point is that there is only one ultimately real thing, the Absolute, which is spiritual in nature.

Google previewThe Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (2016)

by Simon Blackburn

absolute idealism 19thcentury version of *idealism in which the world is ...

Google previewA dictionary of philosophy in the words of philosophers (1887)

by J. Radford Thomson

Absolute Idealism. Hegel. To be in earnest with idealism, Hegel said to himself, is to find all things whatever but forms of thought. But how is that possible without a standard — without a form of thought, that, in application to things, will reduce ...

Google previewDictionary of Critical Realism (2015)

by Mervyn Hartwig

Absolute idealism posits a pervasive entity, consciousness, spirit or cognate system that can be immanent, transcendent or progressively realised in or as reality. In the Western tradition this has ambiguous roots in classical Greek philosophy.

Google previewAmerican Philosophy: An Encyclopedia (2008)

by John Lachs, Robert B. Talisse

Absolute idealism remained influentialwell into the twentieth century, butnot without its critics. Fellow idealists criticized absolute idealism as being deterministic, pantheistic, and unable to account for individual selves. Borden Parker Bowne,in ...

Google previewThe Hegel Dictionary (2010)

by Glenn Alexander Magee

Hegel's position is quite different from these, and is often termed 'Objective Idealism' (or sometimes, misleadingly, 'Absolute Idealism'). It traces its philosophical lineage back to Aristotle, who accepted the existence of Platonic forms but made ...

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