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Affective fallacy

Explanation

Affective fallacy is a term from literary criticism used to refer to the supposed error of judging or evaluating a text on the basis of its emotional effects on a reader. The term was coined by W.K. Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley as a principle of New Criticism.

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for Affective fallacy

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Google previewRemembering Dionysus (2016)

Revisioning psychology and literature in C.G. Jung and James Hillman by Susan Rowland

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between a poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological...

Google previewThe Verbal Icon (2015)

Studies in the Meaning of Poetry by W.K. Wimsatt

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological skepticism, though usually advanced as if it had far stronger claims than the overall forms of skepticism.

Google previewThe Author Is Not Dead, Merely Somewhere Else (2008)

Creative Writing after Theory by Michelene Wandor

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological scepticism. It begins by trying to derive the standard of criticism from the psychological effects of the poem and ...

Google previewAffect Theory and Early Modern Texts (2017)

Politics, Ecologies, and Form by Amanda Bailey, Mario DiGangi

confusion between the poem and its origins” and “begins by trying to derive the standard of criticism from the psychological causes of the poem and ends in biography and relativism,” whereas “the Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the ...

Google previewThe End of Literary Theory (1987)

by Stein Haugom Olsen

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological scepticism, though usually advanced as if it had far stronger claims than the overall forms of scepticism.5 Here ...

Google previewGulliver's Travels By Jonathan Swift (2016)

by NA NA

as fallacious the very notion that a reader's response is part of the meaning of a literary work: The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does). . . . It begins by trying to derive the standards of ...

Google previewQuestions of English (2000)

Ethics, Aesthetics, Rhetoric, and the Formation of the Subject in England, Australia, and the United States by Robin Peel, Annette Hinman Patterson, Jeanne Marcum Gerlach

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does)...

Google previewHerod the Fox (1998)

Audience Criticism and Lukan Characterization by John A. Darr

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological scepticism, though usually advanced as if it had far stronger claims than the over-all forms of scepticism.

Google previewReturn Of Reader (2013)

by Elizabeth Freund

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does).

Google previewThe British Critical Tradition (1993)

A Re-Evaluation by Gary Day

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results. . . . It begins by trying to derive the standard of criticism from the psychological effects of the poem and ends in impressionism and relativism. The outcome...

Google previewCritical Theory and Practice: A Coursebook (2006)

by Keith Green, Jill LeBihan

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does) . . . It begins by trying to derive the standards ofcriticism from the psychological effects ofthe poem and ends in impressionism and relativism.

Google previewPractical Stylistics (1992)

An Approach to Poetry by H. G. Widdowson

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does . . .). It begins by trying to derive the standard of criticism from the psychological effects of the poem and ends in impressionism and relativism.

Google previewMutual Misunderstanding (1992)

Scepticism and the Theorizing of Language and Interpretation by Talbot J. Taylor

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological scepticism, though usually advanced as if it had far stronger claims than the overall forms of scepticism.

Google previewIs There a Text in this Class? (1980)

The Authority of Interpretive Communities by Stanley Eugene Fish

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does)...

Google previewEnglish and American Studies (2016)

Theory and Practice by Martin Middeke

The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological skepticism, though usually advanced as if it had far stronger claims than the overall forms of skepticism.

Google previewLiterary Criticisms of Law (2000)

by Guyora Binder, Robert Weisberg

The affective fallacy is a confusion between the poem and its results (what it is and what it does), a special case of epistemological skepticism. . . . It begins by trying to derive the standard of criticism from the psychological effects of the poem ...

Google previewReader-Response Criticism (1980)

From Formalism to Post-Structuralism by Jane P. Tompkins

In the context of Anglo-American criticism, the reader-response movement arises in direct opposition to the New Critical dictum issued by Wimsatt and Beardsley in "The Affective Fallacy" (1949): "The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between ...

Google previewCulture and the Ad: Exploring Otherness in the World of ...

In the context of Anglo-American criticism, the reader-response movement arises in direct opposition to the New Critical dictum issues by Wimsatt and Beardsley in "The Affective Fallacy" (1949): "The Affective Fallacy is a confusion between ...

Google previewThe Columbia Dictionary of Modern Literary and Cultural Criticism (1995)

by Joseph Childers, Gary Hentzi

AFFECTIVE FALLACY Pater, Walter. The Renaissance. Ed. Donald L. Hill. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980. Wilde, Oscar. The Decay of Lying. New York: Sunflower Co., 1902. AESTHETIC IDEOLOGY. The phrase aesthetic ...

Google previewA Dictionary of Media and Communication (2016)

by Daniel Chandler, Rod Munday

affective fallacy A tendency to relate the meaning of a text to its readers' interpretations, which is criticized as a form of relativism by those literary theorists who claim that meaning resides primarily within the text (see also ...

Google previewA Dictionary of Critical Theory (2010)

by Ian Buchanan

affective fallacy distinction of interest only to specialists in the field of *ontology, since the advent of computer games, and more especially the Internet, this distinction has become very important because it allows that what is seen or ...

Google previewThe Anthem Dictionary of Literary Terms and Theory (2010)

by Peter Auger

affective fallacy The error of basing an interpretation on the reader's SUBJECTIVE impressions, rather than a ...

Google previewThe Routledge Dictionary of Philosophy (2009)

by Michael Proudfoot, A.R. Lacey

Affective fallacy M. Budd, The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature, Oxford UP, 2003. (Collection of essays, including good discussion of Kant.) R. G. Collingwood, The Principles of Art, Clarendon, 1938. *D. Cooper, A ...

Google previewA Dictionary of Stylistics (2014)

by Katie Wales

who disliked this kind of judgment because it is too subjective, referred to it as the affective fallacy. However, recent critics engaged in EMPIRICAL LITERARY STUDIES ...

Google previewEncyclopedia of British Poetry (2015)

by Robert R. Watson

Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsleytermed these problematic approaches the intentional fallacy andthe affective fallacy intwo eponymous essays.

Google previewDictionary of Jargon (Routledge Revivals) (2013)

by Jonathon Green

See also affective fallacy. consensus painting n[Art] a Marxistterm that definesthestyle of painting produced in the UK;it represents the consensus of British bourgeois taste as regardswhat is 'good art' and thus what is the ideal world whichit ...

Google previewDictionary Of English Literat. (2002)

by Rajni Sehgal

Affective fallacy. A term in literary criticism introduced by W.K. Wimsatt, Jr. and M.C. Beardsley to describe the error of judging a literary work primarily by its emotional appeal. Affective meaning That part of meaning which is composed of ...

Google previewEncyclopedia of Contemporary Literary Theory (1993)

Approaches, Scholars, Terms by Irene Rima Makaryk

and 'The Affective Fallacy' (1949), written in collaboration with Monroe Beardsley; together these papers are seen as the fullest account of the doctrines of ...

Google previewAn Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2012)

by G.H.R. Parkinson

The popularity recently of objective theories owes much to the fear of committing the Intentional Fallacy orthe Affective Fallacy. These fallacies were the inventions ofW.K.Wimsatt and MonroeC. Beardsley.19 The intentional fallacyisthat of ...

Google previewThe Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Philosophers in America (2016)

From 1600 to the Present by John R. Shook

Affective Fallacy” (1949). In 1958 Beardsley published Aesthetics: Problems in the Philosophy of Criticism, which immediately became known as a landmark statement of philosophical perspectives on the arts in the twentieth century.

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