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Afro-Cuban jazz

Music

  1. Afro-Cuban jazz is the earliest form of Latin jazz. It mixes Afro-Cuban clave-based rhythms with jazz harmonies and techniques of improvisation. Afro-Cuban jazz first emerged in the early 1940s with the Cuban musicians Mario Bauza and Frank Grillo "Machito" in the band Machito and his Afro-Cubans, based in New York City. In 1947 the collaborations of bebop innovator Dizzy Gillespie with Cuban percussionist Chano Pozo brought Afro-Cuban rhythms and instruments, most notably the tumbadora and the bongo, into the East Coast jazz scene. Early combinations of jazz with Cuban music, such as Dizzy's and Pozo's "Manteca" and Charlie Parker's and Machito's "Mangó Mangüé", were commonly referred to as "Cubop", short for Cuban bebop.. During its first decades, the Afro-Cuban jazz movement was stronger in the United States than in Cuba itself. In the early 1970s, the Orquesta Cubana de Música Moderna and later Irakere brought Afro-Cuban jazz into the Cuban music scene, influencing new styles such as songo.
  2. "Afro-Cuban Jazz" is a musical album of Chucho Valdés & Bebo Valdés.
  3. "Afro-cuban Jazz" a.k.a. "Afro Cuban Jazz" is a musical album of Snowboy & The Latin Section.
    • released on (15 years ago)
  4. "Afro-Cuban Jazz" is a musical album of Mario Bauzá.

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for Afro-Cuban jazz

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Google previewEncyclopedia of Latino Popular Culture (2004)

by Cordelia Candelaria

Afro-Cuban jazz pioneer Frank Grillo, better known as "Machito," made a lasting impact on the growth of Latin music in the United States and Latin America. Born on February 16, 1912, in Tampa, Florida, Machito was raised in Cuba and grew ...

Google previewEncyclopedia of the African Diaspora: Origins, Experiences, and Culture [3 volumes] (2008)

Origins, Experiences, and Culture by Carole Elizabeth Boyce Davies

Afro-Cuban jazz drew from Afro- Cuban rhythms (rumba, son, ritual music) and U.S. jazz. The two major creative ...

Google previewThe Concise Garland Encyclopedia of World Music (2013)

by Garland Encyclopedia of World Music,

Afro-Cuban jazz gained a much larger audience in 1946, when Dizzy Gillespie ...

Google previewBlack Music and Musicians in The New Grove Dictionary of American Music and The New Harvard Dictionary of Music (1989)

by Dominique-René De Lerma, Marsha J. Reisser

Popular music, jazz, and gospel music Schuller, Gunther Afro-Cuban jazz Coleman, Omette Ellington, Duke [Edward Kennedy] Jam session Mainstream jazz Morton, Jelly Rol [LaMothe; Lemott, Ferdinand Joseph] Moten, Bennie [ Benjamin] ...

Google previewContinuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume 8 (2012)

Genres: North America by John Shepherd, David Horn

Following the structural models of the Cuban son, son conjunto and mambo genres, early Afro-Cuban jazz musicians tended to favor improvisation over montunos: rhythmically animated ostinato sections consisting of two to four repeated ...

Google previewThe Encyclopedia of New York City (2010)

Second Edition by Kenneth T. Jackson, Lisa Keller, Nancy Flood

established Afro-Cuban jazz, a blend of big-band orchestration, bop improvisation, and three rhythmic streams: swing, bop, and Afro-Cuban.

Google previewThe Palgrave Dictionary of Transnational History (2016)

From the mid-19th century to the present day by A. Iriye, P. Saunier

As percussionist with the Gillespie big band, Chano Pozo co-wrote with Gillespie the Afro-Cuban jazz classic 'Manteca'. Another Cuban Conguero, Mongo Santamaría, worked with the American vibraphonist Cal Tjader, and Afro-Latin mambo ...

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