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Header of Take

Take

Take appears in the following tongue twister:

  • Two tiny tigers take two taxis to town.

Take appears in the following palindromes (phrases that read the same backward as forward):

  • Did Ione take Kate? No, I did.
  • Rise, take lame female Kate, sir.
  • Puerile note by me, Kate: "take my bet one lire up".
View more palindromes!

Take is sometimes a misspelling of taken, talk, took or turned.

The word take is considered to be an easy one, according to the Dale-Chall word list, which includes 3000 words that all fourth-grade American students should know and understand.

Video footage: take a photo of food in a restaurant with mobile phone camera for social network
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Definition of the noun take

What does take mean as a name of something?

noun - plural: takes

  1. the income or profit arising from such transactions as the sale of land or other property
    • lexical domain: Possessions - nouns denoting possession and transfer of possession
    • synonyms of take: issue / payoff / proceeds / return / takings / yield
    • more generic word: income = the financial gain (earned or unearned) accruing over a given period of time
    • more specific terms:
      • economic rent / rent = the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions
      • payback = financial return or reward
  2. the act of photographing a scene or part of a scene without interruption

Alternative definition of the noun take

noun

  1. An act of taking.
  2. Something that is taken.
  3. A (1) profit, (2) reward, (3) bribe, illegal payoff or unethical kickback.
  4. An interpretation or view; perspective.
  5. [film] An attempt to record a scene.
  6. [rugby] A catch.
  7. [acting] A facial gesture in response to an event.
  8. [cricket] A catch of the ball, especially by the wicket-keeper.

Specialised definition of the noun take

Glossary of sports / rugby union

a good catch of a kick

Definition of the verb take

What does take mean as a doing word?

Take is the 10th most common verb in the English language.View more statistics!

verb - inflections:

simple pastpast participlepresent participlethird-person singular
tooktakentakingtakes

  1. carry out
    • examples: take action | take steps | take vengeance
    • lexical domain: Activities - verbs of political and social activities and events
    • more generic words: act / move = perform an action, or work out or perform
  2. require (time or space)
    • example: They take a long time
    • syntax:
      Syntactic formulaExample for the syntactic formula
      [Theme - concrete object] [Verb] [Beneficiary] [Value]The bill will cost them 500 million dollars
      [Theme - concrete object] [Verb] [Value]The book costs $10

      Measure Verbs (with the same syntax): carry, cost, last, net.

    • lexical domain: Possession - verbs of buying, selling, owning
    • synonyms of take: occupy / use up
    • more generic words: expend / use = use up, consume fully
    • more specific word: be = spend or use time
  3. take somebody somewhere
    • example: can you take me to the main entrance?
    • syntax:
      Syntactic formulaExample for the syntactic formulaVerbs with the same syntax
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme]Nora brought the bookVerb of Sending and Carrying
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] [Destination, locative adverb]The train brought us here
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] against / before / into / on / to / onto [Destination]Nora brought the book to the meeting
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] from / out / out of / off / off of [Source]Nora brought the book from home
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] from / out / out of / off / off of [Source] to [Destination]Nora brought the book from home to the meeting
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] against / before / into / on / to / onto [Destination] [Theme]Nora brought to lunch the book
      [Agent - being or organization] [Verb] [Theme]The thief stole the paintVerbs of Removing: abduct, annex, cabbage, capture, carjack, confiscate, cop, emancipate, embezzle, extort, filch, flog, grab, highjack, hook, kidnap, knock off, liberate, lift, misappropriate, nab, nick, nobble, pickpocket, pilfer, pinch, pirate, plagiarize, purloin, reclaim, redeem, repossess, rescue, rustle, salvage, seize, sequester, shoplift, smuggle, snatch, sneak, steal, swipe, thieve, wangle, wrest
      [Agent - being or organization] [Verb] [Theme] for [Beneficiary]The thief stole the paint for Mary
      [Agent - being or organization] [Verb] [Theme] from / out / out of / off / off of [Source]The thief stole the paint from the museum
      [Agent - being or organization] [Verb] [Theme] from / out / out of / off / off of [Source] for [Beneficiary]The thief stole the paint from John for Mary
    • lexical domain: Motions - verbs of walking, flying, swimming
    • synonyms of take: conduct / direct / guide / lead
    • more specific terms:
  4. get into one's hands, take physically
    • examples: Take a cookie! | Can you take this bag, please | The children take the ball
    • lexical domain: Contact - verbs of touching, hitting, tying, digging
    • synonym of take: get hold of
    • more specific words:
  5. take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect
    • lexical domain: Change - verbs of size, temperature change, intensifying, etc.
    • synonyms of take: acquire / adopt / assume / take on
    • more generic word: change = undergo a change; become different in essence
    • more specific word: re-assume = take on again, as after a time lapse
  6. interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression
  7. take something or somebody with oneself somewhere
    • examples: Take these letters to the boss | They take the food to the people | They take the people the food
    • syntax:
      Syntactic formulaExample for the syntactic formula
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme]Nora brought the book
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] [Destination, locative adverb]The train brought us here
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] against / before / into / on / to / onto [Destination]Nora brought the book to the meeting
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] from / out / out of / off / off of [Source]Nora brought the book from home
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] [Theme] from / out / out of / off / off of [Source] to [Destination]Nora brought the book from home to the meeting
      [Agent - intentional control] [Verb] against / before / into / on / to / onto [Destination] [Theme]Nora brought to lunch the book
    • lexical domain: Motions - verbs of walking, flying, swimming
    • synonyms of take: bring / convey
    • more generic words: carry / transport = move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body
    • more specific terms:
    • entailment: come / come up = move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody
  8. take into one's possession
  9. travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route
    • examples: He takes the bus to work | She takes Route 1 to Newark | The men take the boat
    • lexical domain: Motions - verbs of walking, flying, swimming
    • more generic words: apply / employ / use / utilise / utilize = put into service
  10. pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives
  11. receive willingly something given or offered
  12. assume, as of positions or roles
    • lexical domain: Activities - verbs of political and social activities and events
    • synonyms of take: fill / occupy
    • more generic terms: do work / work = be employed
  13. take into consideration for exemplifying purposes
    • example: Take the case of China
    • lexical domain: Cognition - verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting
    • synonyms of take: consider / deal / look at
    • more generic term: think about = have on one's mind, think about actively
    • more specific terms:
  14. require as useful, just, or proper
    • example: It takes nerve to do what she did
    • syntax:
      Syntactic formulaExample for the syntactic formula
      [Theme 1] [Verb] [Theme 2]Success requires hard work
      [Theme 1] [Verb] [Theme 2] from [Source]Success requires hard work from us
      [Theme 1] [Verb] [Theme 2, arbitrary control with -ing]Success requires working long hours
      [Theme 1] [Verb] [Theme 2, for-complement clause]Success requires for us to work hard
      [Theme 1] [Verb] [Theme 2, that-complement clause]Success requires that we work hard

      Require Verbs (with the same syntax): demand, involve, necessitate, need, require.

    • lexical domain: Stative - verbs of being, having, spatial relations
    • synonyms of take: ask / call for / demand / involve / necessitate / need / postulate / require
    • more specific terms:
      • claim / exact = take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs
      • govern = require to be in a certain grammatical case, voice, or mood
      • draw = require a specified depth for floating
      • cost = require to lose, suffer, or sacrifice
      • cry out for / cry for = need badly or desperately
      • compel = necessitate or exact
  15. experience or feel or submit to
  16. make a film or photograph of something
  17. remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract
  18. serve oneself to, or consume regularly
  19. accept or undergo, often unwillingly
    • lexical domain: Cognition - verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting
    • synonym of take: submit
    • more generic word: undergo = pass through
    • more specific word: test = undergo a test
  20. make use of or accept for some purpose
    • examples: take a risk | take an opportunity
    • lexical domain: Possession - verbs of buying, selling, owning
    • synonym of take: accept
    • more specific word: co-opt = take or assume for one's own use
  21. take by force
  22. occupy or take on
    • example: The men take the horses across the field
    • lexical domain: Motions - verbs of walking, flying, swimming
    • synonyms of take: assume / strike / take up
    • more generic word: move = move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion
  23. admit into a group or community
    • example: Sam cannot take Sue
    • lexical domain: Possession - verbs of buying, selling, owning
    • synonyms of take: accept / admit / take on
    • more generic words: accept / have = receive willingly something given or offered
    • more specific word: profess = receive into a religious order or congregation
  24. ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial
    • example: take a pulse
    • lexical domain: Change - verbs of size, temperature change, intensifying, etc.
    • more generic words: find / get / incur / obtain / receive = receive a specified treatment
  25. be a student of a certain subject
    • lexical domain: Cognition - verbs of thinking, judging, analyzing, doubting
    • synonyms of take: learn / read / study
    • more specific words:
  26. take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs
  27. head into a specified direction
    • lexical domain: Motions - verbs of walking, flying, swimming
    • synonym of take: make
    • more generic word: head = to go or travel towards
  28. point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards
    • example: Take a swipe at one's opponent
    • lexical domain: Competition - verbs of fighting, athletic activities
    • synonyms of take: aim / direct / take aim / train
    • more generic word: position = cause to be in an appropriate place, state, or relation
    • more specific terms:
  29. be seized or affected in a specified way
    • example: take sick
    • lexical domain: Change - verbs of size, temperature change, intensifying, etc.
    • more generic words: become / get / go = enter or assume a certain state or condition
  30. have with oneself; have on one's person
    • examples: She always takes an umbrella | They take more bread
    • syntax: the same syntax as for the sense 7
    • lexical domain: Stative - verbs of being, having, spatial relations
    • synonyms of take: carry / pack
    • more generic words: feature / have = have as a feature
  31. engage for service under a term of contract
    • example: Shall we take a guide in Rome?
    • lexical domain: Possession - verbs of buying, selling, owning
    • synonyms of take: charter / engage / hire / lease / rent
    • more generic words: acquire / get = come into the possession of something concrete or abstract
  32. receive or obtain regularly
  33. buy, select
  34. to get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort
    • example: take shelter from the storm
    • lexical domain: Possession - verbs of buying, selling, owning
  35. have sex with; archaic use
  36. lay claim to; as of an idea
  37. be designed to hold or take
    • example: This surface will not take the dye
    • lexical domain: Stative - verbs of being, having, spatial relations
    • synonym of take: accept
    • more generic word: be = have the quality of being
  38. be capable of holding or containing
    • example: This box won't take all the items
    • syntax:
      Syntactic formulaExample for the syntactic formula
      [Agent - being] [Verb] [Value] in [Location]We sleep five people in each room
      [Location] [Verb] [Value]Each room sleeps five people

      Measure Verbs (with the same syntax): carry, contain, feed, fit, hibernate, hold, house, seat, serve, sleep, store, use.

    • lexical domain: Stative - verbs of being, having, spatial relations
    • synonyms of take: contain / hold
    • more generic word: be = have the quality of being
  39. develop a habit
    • syntax:
      Syntactic formulaExample for the syntactic formula
      [Patient - being] [Verb] to [Destination]He converted to Buddhism
      [Patient - being] [Verb] to [Destination, subject control with -ing]He converted to believing in Buddha

      Verbs of Transformation (with the same syntax): come around, fall, get, get around, get down, go back, resort, return, revert, settle down, shift, turn.

    • lexical domain: Activities - verbs of political and social activities and events
  40. proceed along in a vehicle
  41. obtain by winning
    • example: Winner takes all
    • lexical domain: Competition - verbs of fighting, athletic activities
    • more generic word: win = be the winner in a contest or competition
  42. be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness

Alternative definition of the verb take

verb

  1. [transitive] To grasp with the hands.
  2. [transitive] To grab and move to oneself.
  3. [transitive] To get into one's possession.
  4. [transitive] To accept.
  5. [transitive, military] To gain a position by force.
  6. [transitive] To have sex forcefully with, possibly without consent.
  7. [transitive] To carry, particularly to a particular destination.
  8. [transitive] To choose.
  9. [transitive] To support or carry without failing or breaking.
  10. [transitive] To endure or cope with.
  11. [transitive, baseball] To not swing at a pitch
  12. [transitive] To ingest medicine, drugs, etc.
  13. [transitive, often with “for”] To assume or interpret to be.
  14. [transitive] To enroll (in a class, or a course of study).
  15. [transitive] To participate in, undergo, or experience.
  16. [transitive, climbing] To tighten (take up) a belaying rope. Often used imperatively.
  17. [transitive] To fight or attempt to fight somebody. (See also take on.)
  18. [intransitive] To stick, persist, thrive or remain.
  19. [intransitive] To become.
  20. [transitive, cricket] To catch the ball; especially for the wicket-keeper to catch the ball after the batsman has missed or edged it.
  21. [transitive] To require.
  22. [transitive, photography] To capture using a photographic camera.
  23. [transitive] To last or expend [an amount of time].
  24. [transitive] To use
  25. [transitive] To consider as an instance or example.
  26. [obsolete] To deliver, give (something); to entrust.
  27. [intransitive] To habituate to or gain competency at a task

Film

"Take" is a 2007 American crime thriller directed and written by Charles Oliver and stars Minnie Driver, Jeremy Renner, Bobby Coleman, Adam Rodríguez and David Denman. The film premiered at Tribeca Film Festival on April 27, 2007.

Music

  1. "Take" is a cataloged instance, composition.
  2. "Take" is a musical single of The Colourfield.
    • released in (32 years ago)
  3. "TAKE" is a musical single of KAKO.
    • released on (14 years ago)
  4. "Take" is a musical EP of Ketamine.
  5. "Take" a.k.a. "take:" is a musical EP of :take:.
    • released on (5 years ago)
  6. "TAKE" is a musical album of Roe-Deer.

People

  1. TaKe a.k.a. Dennis Gehlen: Dennis "TaKe" Gehlen is a professional Starcraft-II-commentator and works as a freelancer for Turtle Entertainment which hosts ESL-TV as well as the Electronic Sports League.
  2. Take is an actor.
  3. Take is a musical artist and former member of musical group Head Phones President.

There are other people with in their name, like One Take, Tae Take, Susumu Take, Take Shitto, Yutaka Take, Koshiro Take, Take Ionescu, Take Machida, Kunihiko Take, Masaharu Take and many others.

Miscellanea

Take: A take is a single continuous recorded performance. The term is used in film and music to denote and track the stages of production.

Phrases with Take

Phrases starting with the word Take:

  1. Take 5
  2. take in
  3. take on
  4. take to
  5. take up
  6. take-in
  7. take-up
  8. take aim
  9. take for
  10. take ill
  11. take off
  12. take out
  13. take ten
  14. take arms
  15. take away

Phrases ending with the word Take:

  1. No-Take
  2. to take
  3. Piss-Take
  4. Spit Take

Other phrase containing the word Take:

  1. I Take It

View more phrases with the word Take in thesaurus!

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for Take

Click on a title to look inside that book (if available):

Google previewProblems in Biblical Theology (2011)

Essays in Honor of Rolf Knierim by Henry T. C. Sun, Keith L. Eades

Take” is a similar metaphor from cinema or television. A take is an uninterrupted piece of photography; it therefore has some sort of inherent unity. Whatever metaphors are used for description, the aim is to visualize and name how the parts of ...

Google previewProgress in Colorectal Surgery (2005)

by John Beynon, Nicholas D. Carr

Complete, 100% take is the exception rather than the rule. The perineum is moist and exposing the area to minimise maceration and maximise aeration is difficult, even with a cooperative patient. Moisture predisposes to bacterial growth and ...

Google previewThe dictionary of medical and surgical knowledge, by the editor of the 'Dictionary of useful knowledge'. (1864)

Take of— Horehound leaves . . 1 ounce. Liquorice root . . . J ounce. Boiling water ... 10 ounces. Infuse in a saucepan by the fire for six hours, then boil for ten minutes, strain, and sweeten with moist sugar, finally add to 10 ounces of the liquid ...

Google previewThe Encyclopaedia Britannica, Or, A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and Miscellaneous Literature (1823)

Take from the dimensions what the stem is sided at that place, and set off half of it from the middle line in the half-breadth plan, through which draw a line parallel to the middle line through the three lines squared down, and the half breadth of ...

Google previewTake Control: The Mac OS X Lexicon (2009)

by Sharon Zardetto, Andy Baird

Take Control ebooks also streamline the publication process so that information about quickly changing technical topics can be published while it's still relevant and accurate. This electronic book does not use copy protection because copy ...

Google previewLexicon Pharmaceuticum, Or a Pharmaceutical Dictionary (1828)

Comprehending the Pharmacopoeias of London, Edinburgh, and Dublin, with a Variety of Other Useful Information Relative to Medicine and Pharmacy, Designed Expressly for the Use of Students by Thomas Castle

Take of orange-peel dried, two drachms; lemon-peel fresh, a drachm; cloves bruised, half a drachm; hoiling water, half a pint. Macerate for a quarter of an hour in a lightly covered vessel, and strain. Principally used in dyspepsia, flatulent colic, ...

Google previewA dictionary of the Kalispel or Flat-head Indian language, compiled by the missionaries of the Society of Jesus [or rather by J. Giorda (1879)

by Joseph Giorda

TAKE, v. t. 1st. (If one object) Ies-kunem, Chines-kunei. 2d. (If more than one object) Ies-k6mem, Chines-k6mi.

Google previewAn English-Herero Dictionary (1883)

With an Introduction to the Study of Herero and Bantu in General by F. W. Kolbe

TAKE new missionary), tua end amatu...

Online dictionaries and encyclopedias with entries for Take

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Usage statistics about take

The following statistics are based on the British National Corpus, so they are representative for the British English from the later part of the 20th century, both spoken and written.

Usage statistics for the verb take:

spoken English53.26%written English46.74% conversational speech49.75%task-oriented speech50.25% imaginative writing57.57%informational writing42.43%

Distribution of usage frequency for the most common synonyms of the noun take:

payofftakeyieldreturnissue

Distribution of usage frequency for the most common synonyms of the verb take:

acceptinvolvereadrequireconsidercarryleadbringholdaskneedtakemakegethave

Comparison of usage frequency between the verb take and its most common antonym:

givetake

Photos about Take

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Take

View more pictures about Take Off, Take Away, Take Note, and Take a Seat.

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Small photo of Take a seatSmall photo of take a break More...

Video language resources about Take

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View more videos about take 2, Take in, Take It, Take On, Take Up, To Take, One Take, Take Off, Take Care, Take Over, Take That, Take Steps, Double Take, and Take a Stand.

Sign language

Jesus take the wheel sign language

Quotes about Take

I don't take business seriously, I take acting seriously. I take my job really seriously, but a lot of the job is not about acting, but I don't take business seriously. (Lucy Lawless)
more quotes about take...

Scrabble value of T1A1K5E1

The value of this 4-letter word is 8 points. It is included in the first and second editions of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary.

Anagrams of TAKE

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See also the blanagrams of Take!

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