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abduce

The following statistics are based on the British National Corpus, so they are representative for the British English.

Distribution of usage frequency for the most common synonyms of the verb abduce:

adducecite

Definition of the verb abduce

What does abduce mean as a doing word?

verb - inflections: abduced | abducing | abduces

  1. advance evidence for

Alternative definition of the verb abduce

verb

  1. [transitive] [obsolete] To draw or conduct away; to withdraw; to draw to a different part.
  2. [transitive] To draw a conclusion, especially in metanalysis. Used chiefly in linguistics to refer to the hearer's misunderstanding of the boundary or function of a morphological feature that results in its extension to a new environment and/or function.

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for abduce

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Google previewECAI 2004 (2004)

16th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence, August 22-27, 2004, Valencia, Spain : Including Prestigious Applications of Intelligent Systems (PAIS 2004) : Proceedings by Ramon López de Mántaras, Lorenza Saitta

C n H is satisfiable in T RETURN H END Theorem 2 The concept H returned by the Algorithm abduce is a solution of the CAP (C, D, T). Proof. First, we ...

Google previewEncyclopaedia Metropolitana, Or, Universal Dictionary of Knowledge (1845)

Comprising the Twofold Advantage of a Philosophical and an Alphabetical Arrangement, with Appropriate Engravings by Edward Smedley, Hugh James Rose, Henry John Rose

To abduce,_adduce, conduee, deduce, induce, &c. / To abstract, attract, contract, detract, distract, &c. The difference of meaning, it is obvious, arises from the different preposed or prefixed words ; ab, ad, con, de, dis, in. The Latin compound ...

Google previewDictionary of Obsolete and Provincial English (1880)

Containing Words from the English Writers Previous to the Nineteenth Century which are No Longer in Use, Or are Not Used in the Same Sense and Words which are Now Used Only in the Provincial Dialects

Abduce, v. (Lat. abduco.) To lead away.

Google previewEncyclopaedia Metropolitana; Or, Universal Dictionary of Knowledge on an Original Plan Comprising the Twofold Advantage of a Philosophical and an Alphabetical Arrangement, with Appropriate Engravings Edited by Edward Smedley, Hugh James Rose, Henry John Rose (1845)

Miscellaneous and lexicographical, vol. 1

ABDUCE', Ab: duco, to lead from, ...

Google previewEncyclopædia Metropolitana; Or, Universal Dictionary of Knowledge ... (1845)

Comprising the Twofold Advantage of a Philosophical and an Alphabetical Arrangement, with Appropriate Engravings by Edward Smedley, Hugh James Rose, Henry John Rose

To abduce, adduce, conduce, deduce, induce, &c. To abstract, attract, contract, detract, distract, &c. The difference of meaning, it is obvious, arises from the different preposed or prefixed words ; ab, ad, con, de, dis, in. The Latin compound, then ...

Google previewChambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary (part 1 of 4: A-D)

by Various

Abduce, abdūs′, v.t. an earlierformofAbduct.

Google previewThe Imperial Dictionary of the English Language (1885)

A Complete Encyclopedic Lexicon, Literary, Scientific, and Technological by John Ogilvie

Abduce (ab-dusO, v.t pret. <fc pp. abduced; ppr. abducing.

Google previewA Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the Fourteenth Century (1872)

by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps

ABDUCE. To lead away.

Google previewA Dictionary of Archaic & Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs & Ancient Customs, Form the Fourteenth Century (1852)

by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps

ABDUCE. To lead away.

Google previewEncyclopædia metropolitana; or, Universal dictionary of knowledge, ed. by E. Smedley, Hugh J. Rose and Henry J. Rose. [With] Plates (1845)

by Edward Smedley

ABDUCE', v. \ Ab : duco, to lead from, to draw, Abduc'tion. J bring, or take away from, to withdraw. The noun is much used by writers on English law, and is applied to the forcible taking away of a wife or child; and to common kidnapping.

Google previewGarner's Dictionary of Legal Usage (2011)

by Bryan A. Garner

abduct; abduce. These words overlap in meaning, but are not interchangeable. Both may mean “to draw away (a limb, etc.) from its natural position” ...

Google previewA Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words (1855)

Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the Fourteenth Century by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps

ABDUCE. To lead away.

Google previewA dictionary of daily blunders, by the author of 'A handy book of synonyms'. [With] A handy book of common English synonyms [and] A handy classical dictionary. [3 pt. Issued together in a publisher's casing with the general title Handbook for writers and readers]. (1880)

Allure, entice, attract, decoy, tempt, seduce, abduce.

Google previewA Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage (2001)

by Bryan A. Garner

abduct; abduce. These words overlap in meaning, but are not interchangeable. Both may mean "to draw away (a limb, etc.) from its natural position" ...

Online dictionaries and encyclopedias with entries for abduce

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Scrabble value of A1B3D2U1C3E1

The value of this 6-letter word is 11 points. It is included in the first and second editions of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary.

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