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abducens

Definition of the noun abducens

What does abducens mean as a name of something?

noun - plural: -

  1. a small motor nerve supplying the lateral rectus muscle of the eye

Phrases with abducens

Phrases starting with the word abducens:

  1. abducens nerve
  2. abducens muscle

Phrases ending with the word abducens:

  1. nervus abducens
  2. Bacidia Abducens
  3. Gnypeta abducens
  4. Graphis Abducens
  5. Hormops abducens
  6. Lecidea Abducens
  7. species Gnypeta abducens
  8. Species Hormops Abducens

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for abducens

Click on a title to look inside that book (if available):

Google previewHarwood-Nuss' Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine (2014)

by Allan B. Wolfson, Robert L. Cloutier, Gregory W. Hendey, Louis J. Ling, Jeffrey J. Schaider, Carlo L. Rosen

The abducens is the longest intracranial cranial nerve and the most sensitive to toxins such as botulism or to increased pressure from intracranial mass lesions. The remainder of the neurologic examination in the patient complaining of ...

Google previewAdvances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery (2008)

by Nejat Akalan, C. Di Rocco, Vinko V. Dolenc, J. Lobo Antunes, J.J.A. Mooij, J. Schramm, Marc Sindou

The abducens is a small nerve which supplies a single muscle. Usually shifted downward and distorted between two fixed points. Sometimes involved and encased by the tumor if the lesion is an external one like a chordoma. Acousticofacial ...

Google previewA System of Anatomy and Physiology (1801)

With the Comparative Anatomy of Animals : Compiled from the Latest and Best Authors : Arranged, as Nearly as the Nature of the Work Would Admit, in the Order of the Lectures Delivered in the University of Edinburgh

Praeputium abducens is a single muscle which arises ...

Google previewA System of Anatomy and Physiology with the Comparative Anatomy of Animals (1791)

Praputium abducens is a single muscle which arises by a finals fleshy belly from the sphincter ani and accelerator minæ ; at the fore-part of which it runs along the under side of the urethra, to be inserted ...

Google previewThe Carolina Medical Journal (1899)

The abducens is the most frequently involved ; rarely the motor oculi ; nystagmis is sometimes present. Trigemial anesthesia, hyperesthesia and paraesthesia are present quite frequently ; disturbances of vision, spasms and paralysis are ...

Google previewA Brief Anatomy of the Turtle (1940)

by Glenn Arthur Noble, Elmer Ray Noble

The abducens is a small nerve arising on the ventral surface of the medulla a short distance from the median line at about the same level as the acustico-facial root (see below) . It passes anteriorly to the orbit, where it innervates the external ...

Google previewProgressive Medicine (1921)

A Quarterly Digest of Advances, Discoveries, and Improvements in the Medical and Surgical Sciences by Hobart Amory Hare

The abducens is the most frequently affected, but there may be conjugate paralysis and nystagmus. Less frequently there are changes in the other cranial nerves, disturbances of speech and difficult deglutition. There may also be disturbance ...

Google previewFrog: An Introduction To Anatomy, Histology And Embryology (1999)

by F.W. Gamble

The abducens is a very slender nerve which arises from the ventral surface of the medulla close to the median line, and a short way behind the pituitary body. It passes either through, or in very close contact with, the Gasserian ganglion, and ...

Google previewEssays on physiology and hygiene (1838)

by John Bell

A further indication of the feeble influence of the will upon the musculus abducens is the fact, that few persons are able to abduct simultaneously both eyes, whereas every body can readily perform converging motions. As we commonly ...

Google previewProgressive Medicine. a Quarterly Digest of Advances, Discoveries, and Improvements in the Medical and Surgical Sciences (1921)

The abducens is the most frequently affected, but there may be conjugate paralysis and nystagmus. Less frequently there are changes in the other cranial nerves, disturbances of speech and difficult deglutition. There may also be disturbance ...

Google previewBasic Physiology (2012)

by P.D. Sturkie

The abducens is a purely motor nerve. Interspersed throughout the pons are some important sensory and motor ...

Google previewAdler's Physiology of the Eye (2011)

by Paul Leon Kaufman, Francis Heed Adler, Leonard A. Levin, A. Alm

Because the abducens is the final common pathway for all lateral conjugate eye movements, lesions there affect saccades, pursuit and the VOR. Lesions in the PPRF only limit horizontal saccades of both eyes to the ipsilateral side and cause ...

Google previewAnomalies and Diseases of the Eye (1902)

by Flavel Benjamin Tiffany

The abducens is the most often attacked. In tubercular meningitis the pupils are dilated and sluggish. Nystagmus is not infrequent. Meningitis may cause anaesthesia of the cornea, which may result in neuro-paralytic keratitis. Occasionally the ...

Google previewInternational Record of Medicine and General Practice Clinics (1916)

by Edward Swift Dunster, James Bradbridge Hunter, Charles Euchariste de Medicis Sajous, Frank Pierce Foster, Gregory Stragnell, Henry J. Klaunberg, Félix Martí-Ibáñez

The abducens is the nerve most frequently involved. There may be an involvement of the associated movements of the eyes to the right or to the ...

Google previewClinical Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience (2011)

by Estomih Mtui, Gregory Gruener, M. J. T. FitzGerald

Beside the abducens is the pontine gaze center , ...

Google previewNew York Medical Journal (1916)

The abducens is the nerve most frequently involved. There may be an involvement of the associated movements of the eyes to the right or to the ...

Google previewLondon Medical Gazette (1837)

Or, Journal of Practical Medicine

A further indication of the feeble influence of the will upon the musculus abducens is the fact, that few persons are able to abduct simultaneously both eyes,whereas every body can readily perform converging motions. As we commonly ...

Google previewTextbook of Ophthalmology in the Form of Clinical Lectures (1917)

by Paul Roemer

The abducens is the nerve most apt to be affected at the base of the brain by a lateral tumor of the cerebellum, while the pareses of the oculomotor are usually due to lesions of the nuclear regions in the corpora quadrigemina. Oppenheim first ...

Google previewEncyclopedia of the Eye (2010)

by Joseph Besharse, Reza Dana

The abducens nucleus, which lies in the pons, may be regarded as the horizontal gaze center (Figure 1, site 4). Thus, the abducens nucleus receives inputs for each functional class of eye movements, including saccades, smooth pursuit, ...

Google previewA Dictionary of Neurological Signs (2016)

by A.J. Larner

A Abducens (VI) Nerve Palsy Cross References Beevor's sign; Upper motor neurone (UMN) syndrome Abducens (VI) Nerve Palsy Abducens, abducent, or sixth, cranial nerve palsy causes a selective weakness of the lateral rectus muscle ...

Google previewAn Encyclopedia-dictionary and Reference Handbook of the Ophthalmic Sciences (1903)

Designed to Give, in Complete and Accurate Statement, and in the Readiest Form for Popular Use, the Orthography, Pronunciation, Meaning and Etymology of All the Words and Terms Used in the Ophthalmic Sciences by Robert H. Knowles, Rollin Henry Knowles

A prefix meaning from or away, thus Abducens = Leading away or turning away from. Abnormal— Away from normal [norma = law literally] . Abbe, Prof. Ernst, Jena, Germany, invented an apparatus for measuring the Indices of Refraction.

Google previewEncyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences (2014)

The abducens nerve has a relatively long course with several important clinical relationships. The abducens nucleus lies in close proximity to the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF) and facial nerve genu within the lower pons at ...

Google previewDictionary of Human Neuroanatomy (2012)

by Martin C. Hirsch

— Dopaminergic cell groups A8-A10 Abducens nerve (WI) Nerves 3 TA Latin: N. abducens (N. VI) TA ...

Google previewStedman's Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing (2005)

by Thomas Lathrop Stedman

syN abducens. 2. SYN abducent nerve [CN VI]. [L. abducens] ab-du-cent nerve [ CN VI] (ab-du'sént nérv) A small motor nerve supplying the lateral rectus muscle of the eye; its origin is in the dorsal part of the tegmentum of the pons just below ...

Google previewThe Encyclopedia of the Muscle and Skeletal Systems and Disorders (2005)

by Mary Harwell Sayler

abducens muscle weak abdominal muscles that have become burdened by additional weight. See also EXERCISE; NUTRITION. Murphy, Myatt. “Get Abs Fast.” Men's Fitness (March 2002): 23a. Wilkins, Rob. “Phenomenal Abdominals in 8 ...

Google previewTaber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary (2013)

by Donald Venes, MD

abducens n. A somatic motor nerve ...

Google previewConcise Colour Medical Dictionary (2015)

by Elizabeth Martin

abducens. nerve. the sixth *cranial nerve (VI), which supplies the lateral rectus muscle of each eyeball, responsible for turning the eye outwards. abduct. vb. to move a limb or any other part away from the midline of the body. —abduction n.

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Video about abducens

Abducens Meaning

Video shows what abducens means. The abducens nerve: the nerve in humans and most animals that governs the motion of the lateral rectus muscle of the ...

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Scrabble value of A1B3D2U1C3E1N1S1

The value of this 8-letter word is 13 points. It is included in the first and second editions of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary.

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