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Superconductivity

Video footage: BURNABY BC CANADA - MAY 9 2015 Superconductivity experiment using LN2 and magnets
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Definition of the noun superconductivity

What does superconductivity mean as a name of something?

noun - plural: superconductivities

  1. the disappearance of electrical resistance at very low temperatures
    • examples: Superconductivity is a physical property. | In conventional superconductors, the Cooper pairs are responsible for superconductivity. | Superconductivity occurs when a metal loses all resistance to the flow of an electric current.
    • lexical domain: Natural Phenomena - nouns denoting natural phenomena
    • more generic term: electrical conduction = the passage of electricity through a conductor

Writings

  1. "Superconductivity" is a written work.
  2. "Superconductivity" is a book by D. Shoenberg.
  3. "Superconductivity" is a book by E. A. Lynton.
  4. "Superconductivity" is a book by Werner Buckel.
    • also known as "Superconductivity: fundamentals and applications"
  5. "Superconductivity" is a book by A. W. B. Taylor.

There are many other writings with this title.

Printed dictionaries and other books with definitions for Superconductivity

Click on a title to look inside that book (if available):

Google previewUnconventional Superconductors (2006)

Experimental Investigation of the Order-Parameter Symmetry by Gernot Goll

Superconductivity is the phenomenon of dissipationless transport which occurs in many metals at sufficiently low temperatures. Metals in the superconducting state reach a new ground state which allows the material to minimize its free energy ...

Google previewInvitation to Contemporary Physics (2004)

by Quang Ho-Kim, Narendra Kumar, Harry C. S. Lam

After all, room temperature superconductivity is a distinct possibility in the decades to come. And in...

Superconductivity is the complete disappearance of the electrical resistance of a material at and below a certain critical temperature which is ...

Google previewNew Frontiers in Superconductivity Research (2006)

by Barry P. Martins

Superconductivity is the ability of certain materials to conduct electrical current with no resistance and extremely low losses.

Google previewYBCO Superconductor Research Progress (2008)

by Li-Chun Liáng

Superconductivity is the ability of certain materials to conduct electrical current with no resistance and extremely low losses.

Google previewPerspectives on Superconductivity Research (2007)

by Paul S. Lewis

Preface Superconductivity is the ability of certain materials to conduct electrical current with no resistance and extremely low losses. High temperature superconductors, such as La2- xSrxCuox (Tc=40K) and YBa2Cu307-x (Tc=90K), were ...

Google previewA Modern Course in the Quantum Theory of Solids (2013)

by Fuxiang Han

Superconductivity is a property of many materials (including metals and metallic compounds). If a material possesses this property, it looses its resistance and becomes perfectly diamagnetic as the temperature is low— ered below a certain ...

Google previewOrbital Interactions in Chemistry (2013)

by Thomas A. Albright, Jeremy K. Burdett, Myung-Hwan Whangbo

Superconductivity is a phenomenon which occurs at low temperatures in some conductors. In this state, the electrons undergo a collective ordered transition where all electrical resistance disappears below a specific temperature (To).

Google previewThe Engineering Handbook, Second Edition (2004)

by Richard C. Dorf

ideal behind all of a superconductor's unique properties is that superconductivity is a quantum mechanical phenomenon on a macroscopic scale created when the motions of individual electrons are correlated. According to the theory ...

Google previewBasic Superfluids (2003)

by Tony Guenault

Since superconductivity is a low temperature phenomenon, the contribution of the lattice to the heat capacity is usually small, or at any rate known well enough to be subtracted from the total heat capacity. At low temperatures, typically below ...

Google previewNMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in Solid Materials (2012)

by Roderick E. Wasylishen, Sharon E. Ashbrook, Stephen Wimperis

Superconductivity is a somewhat fragile state of matter that exists only under specialized conditions. The electrons of a normal metal undergo an electronic phase transition below a critical temperature TC and below a critical magnetic field ...

Google previewElectronics, Power Electronics, Optoelectronics, Microwaves, Electromagnetics, and Radar (2006)

by Richard C. Dorf

The fundamental ideal behind all of a superconductor's unique properties is that superconductivity is a quantum mechanical phenomenon on a macroscopic scale created when the motions of individual electrons are correlated. According to ...

Google previewElectricity and Magnetism (2013)

by Edward M. Purcell, David J. Morin

To the physicist, superconductivity is a fascinating large-scale manifestation of quantum mechanics.

Google previewThe Physics of Superconductors (2004)

Vol II: Superconductivity in Nanostructures, High-Tc and Novel Superconductors, Organic Superconductors by Karl-Heinz Bennemann, John B. Ketterson

High temperature superconductivity is a result of strong electronic correlations. Couple this prevailing thesis with the lack of controlled analytic methods for most relevant models, and the strong motivation for numerical approaches becomes ...

Google previewThe Cold Wars (2003)

A History of Superconductivity by Jean Matricon, G. Waysand

Continuing discoveries showed that superconductivity is a phenomenon that is not limited to just a few metals but is, in fact, widespread.

Google previewBonding Theory for Metals and Alloys (2005)

by Frederick E. Wang

BACKGROUND Superconductivity is a phenomenon in which the resistance of the material to the electric current flow is zero. Kamerlingh Onnes made the first discovery [1] of the phenomenon in 1911 in mercury (Hg) as shown in Fig.1.

Google previewEncyclopedia of Nonlinear Science (2006)

by Alwyn Scott

J ESPER M YGIND See also Josephson junctions; Superconductivity Further Reading Duzer, T.Van& Turner, C.W. 1998. Principlesof Superconductive Devices and Circuits, Upper SaddleRiver, NJ: Prentice-Hall, pp. 256¥283 Kadin, A.M. ...

Google previewIllustrated Encyclopedia of Applied and Engineering Physics, Three-Volume Set (2017)

by Robert Splinter

A total of 27 elements become superconductive at normal pressure, whereas many composite materials are continuously being developed that can reach superconductivity at relatively high temperatures. The material with the highest ...

Google previewDictionary of Metals (2012)

by Harold M. Cobb

It also allows the development of levitated transit systems capable of high speeds , and provides an economically feasible way of producing the large magnetic fields required for the confinement of ionized gases in controlled Superconductivity ...

Google previewDictionary of Pure and Applied Physics (2000)

by Dipak Basu

The theory describes superconductivity as a quantum phenomenon, in which the conduction electrons move in pairs and thus show no electrical resistance. superconductivity, destruction by currents High current densities cause a ...

Google previewConcise Encyclopedia of Magnetic and Superconducting Materials (2005)

by K.H.J. Buschow

In the present volume, the majority of articles deal with the advances of recent years, combining new developments in the field of magnetism and superconductivity with earlier articles describing the achievements reached in those topological ...

Google previewEncyclopedia of 20th-Century Technology (2005)

by Colin Hempstead, William Worthington

Superconductivity: Its Historical Roots and Development from Mercury to the Ceramic Oxides. American Institute of Physics, New York, 1992. Hulm, J.K. International Cooperative—Collaborative Perspectives: Superconductive ...

Google previewDictionary of Colloid and Surface Science (1989)

by Paul Becher

superconductivity n The condition under which an electrical current flows against little or no ohmic resistance. It was formerly believed that this ...

Google previewEncyclopedia of Computer Science and Technology (1991)

Volume 25 - Supplement 10: Applications of Artificial Intelligence to Agriculture and Natural Resource Management to Transaction Machine Architectures by Allen Kent, James G. Williams

Hoist, there has been a great deal of interest in trying to understand the basic phenomena of superconductivity and to develop practical applications for it. The property which ...

Google previewFiber Optics Standard Dictionary (1997)

by Martin Weik

superconductivity 978 bytes), low storage access time, such as 10 ps ( picoseconds), ultrahigh switching speeds, such as 1 ps, and fast operational speeds, such as 100 Gflops (gigafloating point operations per second), and perhaps using ...

Google previewA Dictionary of Science (2010)

by Elizabeth A. Martin

superconductivity The absence ofmeasurable electrical resistance in certain ...

Google previewConcise Encyclopedia of Semiconducting Materials & Related Technologies (2013)

by S. Mahajan, L. C. Kimerling

restores the normal resistive state and eliminates superconductivity. Analogously there is a critical current density J. because of the self-induced magnetic field.

Google previewVan Nostrand’s Scientific Encyclopedia (2013)

by Douglas M. Considine, Glenn D. Considine

Superconductivity: The Near and Long Term Outlook,” Chem. Eng. Progress, 72 (May 1988). Cava ...

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Scrabble value of S1U1P3E1R1C3O1N1D2U1C3T1I1V4I1T1Y4

The value of this 17-letter word is 30 points. Since it has more than 15 letters, it can be played on Super Scrabble board only.

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